Ethical Sales and Communication in Dentistry

May 5, 2014

Ethical Sales and Communication with our patients is one of the core values of the best dental practices I work with. Clear communication remains the most challenge aspect of both personal and business relationship growth. Dental Practice Report published our article The Importance of Creating and Building Relationships with the Dental Patient. Dr. Erin Elliott and I discuss the relationship rules that apply to our personal and professional communication:

  • People choose other people they like and trust
  • The best way to know what someone wants is to ask
  • Don’t make assumptions or you may believe them to be true
  • If you don’t like the answers you’re getting, ask better questions
  • There’s never a second chance to make a great first impression
  • If someone does not weigh in on a decision, they cannot truly buy into it

Here’s the link: Read my full article on the importance of creating & building a relationship with the dental patient published on Dental Products Report 

Swimming With the Fishes: Breakthrough Communication Success

April 16, 2014

Just back from speaking at the Excellence in Dentistry, Inc. meeting in Destin, Florida. The theme of this year’s meeting was “The Godfathers of Dentistry”  You may see in the photo that this was my second “Godfather” experience. This time I was dubbed “The Voice” and presented Breakthrough Communication Success, Six Surprisingly Simple, yet oh, so powerful steps to improve communication and bottom-line results with your team and patients:

#1 Ditch the Drama  #2 It’s a Simple Choice  #3 Challenge the Status Quo

#4 Set Clear Expectations  #5 Tap into Purpose  #6 Distinguish Yourself

What a thrill to be part of an awesome speaker lineup that included Dr. Gordon Christensen, Dr. David Phelps, Dr. Bruce BairdRachel Teel Wall & Wendy Briggs.

A stroll on the pier’s boardwalk at the end of the meeting ended with one of my heels falling 20 feet below into the bay, unretrievable. Nothing left to do but make a wish & toss the other one into the water. Considering the theme, I’m glad it’s just my shoes that are swimming with the fishes!

Prior To The Hire

March 13, 2014

Here is an excerpt from my article Prior To The Hire from The Progressive Dentist Magazine.

There are 6 common biases that create bad hires. Let’s take a closer look to see if you can recognize these behaviors in yourself or your hiring process:

  • Stereotyping: forming a generalized opinion about how people will think, act, or respond, i.e.:  Judging applicants by their physical characteristics such as hair color, body type, or gender, for example, thinking men wouldn’t do well working in the front office or being the only male member of a team.
  • Inconsistent Questions:  Asking different questions of different applicants, i.e.: if you’re not grading on responses to the same questions, how can you truly make comparisons? You must be able to do some quantitative analysis.
  • First Impression Error: Allowing a snap judgment to cloud the entire interview, i.e.: thinking poorly of an applicant because of the school they attended or because you don’t like their fashion sense.
  • Halo / Horn Effect: Allowing one strong or weak point to overshadow everything else, i.e.: learning that an applicant is from your hometown or school or conversely, has a tattoo or piercing visible. Often this occurs based on an answer to one question that is different than you expected.
  • Contrast Effect: Believing good candidates who interview right after weak candidates are stronger by comparison than they truly are. Let’s face it, after a few disappointing interviews, it’s easy for an average applicant to make a big impression.
  • Cultural Noise: Failure to recognize when an applicant is being politically correct and/or telling you what you want to hear rather than the actual truth.  Don’t take answers at face value, dig deeper. One of the best replies to a first response is simply “tell me more.” Get very comfortable with a silent pause… give the applicant time to think and chances are you will gain valuable insight. Also be certain to keep your eyes on the candidate as they answer your questions, otherwise you risk missing the visual, the body language clues that they are making things up as they go along.

The full text of article is available for a limited time at TheProDentist.com along with full access to the current issue of this leading subscription-based magazine about the business of dentistry.

Women Rule! And Why That’s Good News for Dentistry

February 24, 2014

Women Rule!As I visit dental practices I believe we’ve all been reaping the benefits of a kinder, smarter, more collaborative female perspective. It would seem women have realized the power and influence we have to create a healthier workplace and we are stepping up to the opportunities at hand. Read the full text of this article from the Spring 2014 Excellence in Dentistry Magazine Breakthrough Communication Success is both my passion and the title of my presentation at the 2014 Excellence in Dentistry Annual Spring Break Seminar Opening Day, Thursday April 10, 2014 in Destin, Florida . Please join me as it’s now up to us as leaders to embrace this new perspective and recognize the opportunities at hand. Forget follow the leader,  let’s “Be the Jones” and lead our teams on purpose.

Employee Drama is Expensive

August 29, 2013

Employee drama, left unchecked is like a dust storm stirring up trouble as it blows through the office. Stick to the facts at hand to avoid being blinded and losing your way. Miscommunication and gossip create the whirlwind of drama.  Drama is expensive in terms of time, talent and bottom-line success. Stick to the facts and clear the air.

Here’s an example a team member submitted to Dentistry IQ along with Ginny Hegarty’s answer as published in an August 2013 Thursday Troubleshooter.

QOur office manager has been in our practice for 30 years and she has a very overpowering personality. She can be quite abrasive and acts very disrespectful at times. She comes and goes as she pleases and has even gotten to the point of having us do a lot of her work. I know she is valuable to the practice, but some of team members are leaving because of her actions. I really like my job and the dentist, and I would like to know the best way to handle this. Our entire team feels the same way as I do.

A: From Ginny Hegarty SPHR, President, Dental Practice Development, Inc., and current president of the Academy of Dental Management Consultants:

It’s very brave of you to want to step up and take this on, and I commend you for your courage. I think my response will give you the very best opportunity to create a positive outcome for everyone. I offer it with all due respect as I’ve been where you are.

There’s a lot going on in your question. Let’s start here. One thing that jumps out at me is that you’re making some judgments that I suggest you revisit. I say this because of your statement, “Our entire team feels the same way I do.” This tells me that rather than each of you talking directly with your office manager, you are all talking “about” your office manager. This is counterproductive and won’t help any of you.

I realize that it’s very difficult to approach someone that you see as “abrasive and disrespectful,” but have you given any thought to how the office manager may feel she is perceived or treated? Is it possible the office manager could be responding in kind to the negativity and tension in the relationship?

Here’s something I have confirmed over and over again with teams I work with. When asked, “If you were personally doing something that was holding the team back, would you want, a) a coworker to tell you directly b) coworkers to talk amongst themselves about the issue or c) coworkers go to the dentist/owner with the issue,” I consistently hear that team members overwhelmingly prefer that someone come to them directly. This kind of leadership and accountability involves constructive confrontation of the issues rather than involving others in your issues.

Once we involve others, we discuss our opinions and we start judging. By definition, judging is forming an opinion of somebody or something. If this is done before speaking directly with the person, these opinions are made without all the relevant facts.

These opinions then become the story we tell ourselves about what is going on, rather than what is actually happening. The story takes on a life of its own, drama ensues, and many well-intentioned people get hurt. This can be overwhelming for everyone on the team, including the office manager.

As time goes on, there can be so many layers and twists to the plot and so many hurt feelings, that people forget where the line between fact and fiction is. In my experience, everyone soon has a well rehearsed part to play and the practice moves further away from the truth into a soap opera of its own creation. It’s time to stop this insanity.

I have two recommendations for you:
First, I’d ask you to take a deep breath and revisit your story. Take your question apart line by line and remove your opinions so that you have only the facts at hand.

I think you’ll be left with:
*  The office manager has been there 30 years
*  You like your job and your dentist
*  There is a situation that needs to be handled
*  You want to help

Second, I would consider “how can you help?” You might consider one last behind the scenes meeting with your coworkers to discuss taking personal accountability to focus on solutions rather than blame.

Then, begin by addressing your own responsibilities or concerns with your office manager.  Start with one pressing issue, not a list of past issues. Your goal is to change the dynamic and make it more positive and productive. This is a process. When others come to you to discuss their issues, do not get involved; encourage them to also take their concerns directly to the office manager.

I’m not blaming you or your coworkers, your office manager, or your doctor. You’ll notice that I haven’t addressed the issue of blame at all. I don’t know enough to even begin to, and it would be counterproductive. It’s far more effective to discuss shared purpose and positive change with a forward focus. You all deserve better. Hopefully this is a good first step for all of you.

You might also want to address the bigger team issue, and realize that when this type of drama thrives, profitability generally suffers. What’s the best way to support the entire team to start over with new intention? What are your shared goals? How can you bring everyone together to work toward solutions and avoid blame? Often, this is best done in a practice retreat with an outside, objective facilitator guiding the group. Please feel free to contact me atginny@ginnyhegarty.com.

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/08/thursday-troubleshooter2.html

Wild Smiles Breakthrough Communication Success

August 19, 2013

If you’re in the Fayetteville, Arkansas area this Friday, August 23, 2013 please join me for Wild Smiles 2013

 I’ll be presenting Breakthrough Communication Success and will be joined on the program by Garrett Gunderson, Dr. Marie T. Fluent, Teresa Duncan and Rita Zamora
http://courses.arbraces.com/practice/register

 

Building On Our Parents’ Lessons

August 15, 2013

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION IS OVER. The world has changed. We see this change at every turn as technology influences all aspects of our lives. For those of us whose parents raised us on the value of a great work ethic, it’s important to recognize and respond to the fact that the Industrial Revolution is over. With all due respect to our well-intentioned parents, a  great work ethic is no longer enough.  Today you must engage both your employee and your client’s hearts and heads to effectively connect and create practice growth and success.

After all the cutting edge education and sexy technology is in place, the magic doesn’t happen until your people engage. A Blessings White study done in 2011 reveals that only two of every six employees is truly engaged in the vision and mission of the business. Engagement then is the single biggest leadership challenge that business owners and managers face these days.

A recent INC Magazine article spotlighted the most effective leaders today realize that the workforce no longer responds to the Oz model of leadership; the all knowing, all powerful doesn’t play anymore. We’ve moved from The Age of Autocracy and leaders like Jack Welch in the 80s through The Age of Empowerment with leaders like Meg Whitman in the 90s and we’re now firmly in The Age of Nurture with leaders like Tony Hsieh of Zappos and Whole Food’s John Mackey.

We hear a lot about Culture these days, especially some very famous companies that differentiate themselves with their culture. For example, Apple has a culture of innovation. Zappos’ culture is to “Deliver Happiness.” Fed Ex and Southwest Airlines are companies that have very strong cultures.  It’s important to remember 3 things regarding your culture:

  1. Culture is not a program, it’s a core belief that has staying power and could last forever
  2. Culture is your differentiator; it’s why your team and your patients will choose you over another practice.
  3. Culture cannot be bought; it develops from the inside out, with habits over time.

In my upcoming webinar as part of the Patterson Dental Practicing With the Masters Series,  I am challenging attendees to ‘BE the Joneses.”  The challenge is to stop playing follow the leader and instead to lead on purpose. My intent is that you lead both deliberately (on purpose) and meaningfully (with a focus on your own unique purpose). Once you’ve come together to fully understanding Why You Do What You Do & Who You Are Being When You Do It, your systems, protocols will create structure around your culture.

Please join me on Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 11:00am Central

The T

DentistryIQ: “I Don’t Get Paid When Patients Don’t Show Up”

May 30, 2013

A hygienist wrote in to Dentistry IQ’s Thursday Troubleshooter with this concern:  “I was wondering if anyone else is having to clock back in and out if a patient fails to come and yes, I am a hourly employee. I would appreciate any info.” 

Is this a viable option or a classic “lose/lose” solution? 

 

 http://bit.ly/140UsHL

Stop Team Meeting Deja Vu

May 13, 2013

Ginny Hegarty Morning Huddle Video

About 10 years ago I saw a pattern developing around team meetings. One practice after another seemed to be having what I called “Team Meeting Déjà Vu.” The team and doctors would joke and say “Can’t we just shuffle last year’s meeting agendas and reuse them again this year? After all, it seems like we just keep revisiting the same problems, we never really solve anything.  I’ll bet many of you can relate to that feeling.

To be clear, these were not mediocre or even average practice, they were highly successful practices like many of you, trying to figure out how to get to that next level of success. They were basically putting band-aids on problems, quick fixes that would last for a couple of weeks or months and then old habits would reemerge.  This “déjà vu” or inability to come together to create long-term solutions creates roadblocks that will affect morale and profitability & hold you back.

This is the first of my Morning Huddle Videos for Dental Products Report. View the video for a few quick ideas to shake things up and avoid Team Meeting Deja Vu

Watch for Ginny’s Video Series in Dental Products Report’s Morning Huddle eNewletter

March 22, 2013

I was thrilled to be invited to participate in Dental Products Report‘s Morning Huddle eNewsletter. We recorded a series of videos that will be shared with the DPR audience. DPR’s Editor-in-Chief Thais Carter coordinated the video shoot. Topics included: Let’s Talk About…  The Heart of the Matter, The Power of Focus, Energy Breeds Resuls, Team Meetings, Success in Difficult Conversations and Breakthrough Communication Success. I’m excited for the series launch and to hear your feedback and best take aways

DPR Editor-in-Chief Thais Carter with Ginny Hegarty

DPR Editor-in-Chief Thais Carter with Ginny Hegarty

8 Tips To Be A Better Leader

March 19, 2013

Proud to once again be a part of Dentistry IQ’s 100 Best Tips   Here’s my latest contribution in Dentistry IQ 8 Tips To Be a Better Leader 

8 Tips to Be A Better Leader including a tip from Ginny Hegarty, SPHR

Real-time feedback is where people strategy and strong business results intersect! Nothing changes without your feedback. The more timely your feedback, the more agile your team, and, therefore, the more effective and profitable your business. Embrace a proactive human resource strategy for performance appraisals – this coaching should be a real-time conversation about personal and professional growth to challenge and support team members to take their performance to the next level. The world has changed: mobile phones, Facebook, Twitter, and texting create immediate feedback in every aspect of our lives. It’s time we raise the bar on human resource leadership in dentistry.
-Ginny Hegarty, SPHR Dental Practice Development, Inc.

Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa Claus

December 22, 2012

“Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus. It would be as dreary as if there were no VIRGINIAS. Only faith, fancy, poetry, love, romance can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, Virginia, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding.

No Santa Claus! Thank God he lives and he lives forever. A thousand years from now, Virginia, nay 10 times 10 thousand years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood.” -Excerpt from The New York Sun editorial writer, Francis Pharcellus Church’s letter published September 21, 1897 

As a young child named Virginia, this was my favorite Christmas story! This beautiful letter from the editor of the New York Sun written to 8-year old Virginia O’Hanlon may now be 115 years old, but it has certainly stood the test of time. Editorial writer Francis Church’s prediction that Santa Claus lives and will live forever is repeatedly proven in the selfless, beautiful actions of our friends and colleagues in dentistry.

We are so blessed by our wonderful dental friends!  A couple of recent examples: At this year’s Academy of Dental Management Consultants’ meeting, we learned of fellow member Charlotte Chartier’s organization Allana Smiles founded to alert dentists to the unique dental needs of cancer patients before, during, and after chemotherapy. Today, I read a post on my Facebook about Dr. Ben Burris and his Pro Ortho For Kids initiative. Many of you may know Dr. Burris as the founder of the first chapter of Smile for a Lifetime back in 2008. Who do you know doing great work to benefit our children and our world? How can we contribute and spread the word?

At this very special time of year… and especially this year, in light of recent events, let’s celebrate all the good work being done to love and care for our children in our own communities and around the world. “The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see” …but we can certainly shine the spotlight on these organizations of love and on these folks on who inspire us to contribute and pay it forward. Please share the modern-day Santa Claus in your life.

 

 

http://www.allanasmiles.org/

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